AN ORDINARY MAN

Dad's Memoirs

Comments

Hi Linda, I have read all these now and enjoyed them immensely. Sorry I've come late to them but better late than never. You commented on my father-in-laws story yesterday ( Ericv) and he says a big thank you. He's 86 and started writing his journals last year for his grandchildren. I started reading them last week and asked if he would like me to post them on this site. He didn't really understand what i meant, but he's amazed that people want to read them. He cant use a computer so I'm posting them for him, but they are his words not mine. I think its important that these memories don't get forgotten and should be cherished by all of us. Your dads story was facinating and absorbing. I'm going to get Eric to read it over the next few days.

 

Hi Joe thanks for reading. These stories came from Dads own hand-written notes exactly as he wrote them. I have got about another 50 pages of notes which he dictated to me when he could no longer write (Parkinsons). They are very scrappy, as I am part deaf and he had lost much of his power of speech too, so it's gonna take me a while to sort out my scribbles, and to tell the truth, I am only just coming out of the 'mourning' phase, and haven't felt able to do it just yet - but I will! I am hoping to kindle-publish this when I have enough, it would have made him so happy, and he was so lovely he deserves some recognition. We must never lose all these memories. I look forward to more of Eric's tales. Thanks for reading. Linda

Linda

Thanks Linda, I lost my dad a few years ago so I know exactly what you mean.I miss him every day.You should do it and start to write his memories. Good luck. Joe.

 

AN ORDINARY MAN - PART 2 - HOLIDAYS ABROAD!

Continuing my Dad's Wartime Memories exactly as he wrote them down in longhand. This deals with his arrival and early days in India.

AN ORDINARY MAN - LETTER TO FAMILY - EARLY LIFE IN CAMBERWELL AND BEYOND

Letter written by Dad to his cousin's daughter in the hope that old memories would help her mother fight the onset of dementia.

AN ORDINARY MAN - PART 1 - BRITAIN AT WAR

Part 1 (following the Prologue) of my Dad's Wartime experiences transcribed in his own words.

AN ORDINARY MAN - THE PROLOGUE

This is the Prologue to the transcript of my Dad's memories of his experiences in the Second World War, which he began to write just before his 86th Birthday.
Cherry

FUNKY GIBBON

One day in 1966 – or it may be five, or four – I was standing in the kitchen, when I heard the mighty roar Of Dad’s trusty old blue moped which he...
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Cherry

AN ORDINARY MAN - PART 4 - THE FINAL CURTAIN PART 1

This is an account of the last few years and months or so of my Father’s life told without embellishment in the hope it will help fellow sufferers of...
Cherry

AN ORDINARY MAN - PART 5 - TOWARDS THE SEVENTH AGE

I had dutifully promised to keep Dad at home for as long as humanly possible, and with the help of the wonderful carers (and some not so wonderful)...
Cherry

AN ORDINARY MAN - PART 6 - JOURNEY'S END

My Father, with me and my husband following in our Ford Focus estate, which had taken Dad on so many journeys, was blue-lighted to Lewisham Hospital...
Cherry

AN ORDINARY MAN - PART 7 - THE LAST POST

W e decided that as we had not yet given Dad’s flat up, the wake should be held there, which was only fitting as he had lived there for over 55 years...
Cherry

THE FIXER (IP)

My Dad had always been a fixer. It had come from his Dad, who had been quite handy with most things. But Nan said Grandad had changed quite a lot...

AN ORDINARY MAN - LETTER TO FAMILY 27.8.2004

Recycling a piece previously posted in my Dads Memoirs - AN ORDINARY MAN - as it might be of interest alongside the current Iinspiration point...